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Sons of the Wind

Words and Photography by David Lazar

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3000 miles from Brazil’s capital, Rio de Janeiro, lives a remote tribe whose connection with nature far surpasses that of the ‘developed’ world.

The Desana tribe has a unique connection with its environment and its people call themselves wira pora: sons of the wind. Through their observation of nature, the Desana understand that they must uphold the balance between the environment and its people. They believe that population control is a significant factor in the sustainability of the Earth. Strict management of both their subsistence agriculture and shared community ideologies ensures the management of energy and resources – both of which are ultimately returned to the natural environment.

A girl from the Desana tribe in the Amazon.
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A girl from the Desana tribe in the Amazon.

Macaws preening each other in the afternoon sunlight.
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Macaws preening each other in the afternoon sunlight.

The chief of a village situated near the Amazon River. He wears traditional face paint, a full feather head dress, and his smile shows the warmth and happiness of the peaceful Desana tribe.
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The chief of a village situated near the Amazon River. He wears traditional face paint, a full feather head dress, and his smile shows the warmth and happiness of the peaceful Desana tribe.

Two girls from the Amazonian Brazilian Desana tribe adjust the necklace and ornaments worn as part of their traditional dress.
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Two girls from the Amazonian Brazilian Desana tribe adjust the necklace and ornaments worn as part of their traditional dress.

Portrait of a woman from the Desana tribe wearing traditional ornaments and face paint made from berries.
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Portrait of a woman from the Desana tribe wearing traditional ornaments and face paint made from berries.

Two Brazilian Amazonian children who live by a river in a traditional tribal community play music together. The feathers in the boys’ headdresses are made from a macaw bird, and these are worn to mark the identities of tribal groups.
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Two Brazilian Amazonian children who live by a river in a traditional tribal community play music together. The feathers in the boys’ headdresses are made from a macaw bird, and these are worn to mark the identities of tribal groups.

Published on April 1, 2015
Country: Brazil ›
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